National Geographic airs the Limited Series "Parched" to Coincide with World Water Day

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16 March 2017
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Parched
Photo: National Geographic Channels/Doug Schultz
"Parched"
Premieres Tuesday, March 21 at 9 PM ET/PT
on National Geographic Channel
 
          Beginning on Tuesday, March 21, at 9/8c, National Geographic and Jigsaw Productions present “Parched,” a three-part series narrated by Academy Award-winning director Alex Gibney that investigates water wars from West Virginia and Michigan to Syria and India. The series explores the corporate, political and social interests that are responsible for our water-limited future.


Here’s the schedule:

Parched: Money Flows
Premieres: Tuesday, March 21, 9 p.m.-10 p.m. ET/PT

Many people know about the disaster in Flint, Michigan, where thousands were poisoned by government negligence. What they do not know is that this tragedy is part of a larger, much lesser known story that began in Detroit. When the financial crisis hit in 2008, fast-rising water fees resulted in thousands of residents without access to water in their homes, and precipitated Flint’s disastrous decision to draw water from the Flint River. This episode explores an alarming trend in the water sector, where Wall Street banks control municipalities, ultimately holding the everyday American’s water supply in their grip.
 
Parched: Toxic Waters
Premieres: Tuesday, March 28, 9 p.m.-10 p.m. ET/PT

In West Virginia, a cattle farmer traces the deterioration of his livestock to illegal dumping on the Ohio River in in the 1980s, unraveling a corporate conspiracy by DuPont that leaves thousands at risk. In California’s Central Valley, oil companies have moved into agricultural areas — but when heavy lobbying results in lax oversight and regulation, the result is water contamination. 
 
Parched: Global Water Wars
Premieres: Tuesday, April 4, 9 p.m.-10 p.m. ET/PT

This episode of “Parched” zeros in on the world’s most vulnerable hot spots for water-related conflict. In the shadowy outskirts of India’s capital city, a powerful water mafia steals water from government and private reserves, and sells it to those who can pay the hefty price. Meanwhile in Syria, ISIS uses the region’s limited water supply as a weapon, capturing dams and leaving the locals who depend on them helpless. Get a foreboding look at the world’s future through the lens of global water supply. 


 
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