Tchaikovsky’s 'Iolanta' Shares a Double Bill with 'Bluebeard’s Castle' by Bartók On Great Performances at the Met

Find Shows Print Friendly Version Convert to PDF     

07 July 2015
RicksPicks
Bluebeard's Castle
Photo: Mary Sohl/Metropolitan Opera
Tchaikovsky's Iolanta and Bluebeard's Castle by Bartók
"On Great Performances at the Met"
Sunday, July 12 at 12 p.m. on PBS (Check your local listings)
 
          Acclaimed Polish film director Mariusz Treli?ski makes his highly anticipated Met debut with the Metropolitan Opera's new production, inspired by classic noir films of the 1940s, bringing together two rarely performed one-acts: Tchaikovsky's lyrical fairy tale Iolanta, about the psychological awakening of a blind princess, and Bartók's harrowing Bluebeard's Castle, in which newlywed Judith must open seven locked doors to discover the full depths of her husband's dark secrets.

          Valery Gergiev conducts the double bill, which is a co-production with Teatr Wielki-Polish National Opera. Anna Netrebko stars as the title character in Iolanta, with Piotr Beczala and Aleksei Markov as Vaudémont and Robert, two rivals for her love. Nadja Michael sings the central role of Judith in Bluebeard's Castle, with Mikhail Petrenko as her mysterious and menacing new husband.

          Iolanta/Bluebeard's Castle will be broadcast on THIRTEEN'S Great Performances at the Met Sunday, July 12 at 12 p.m. on PBS. (Check local listings.) (In New York, THIRTEEN will air the program at 12:30 p.m.)
 
         In reviewing the production, The New York Times noted, "There were overwhelming passages in Mr. Gergiev's account of this astonishing Bartok score, with its Expressionist angst and Debussy-like lushness. He brought out rustic, folkloric elements in the music that seemed fresh."

          And Bloomberg found the double-bill to be "thrillingly staged by Mariusz Trelinski... Both operas make poetic use of video in a way I've rarely seen on the opera stage. And both had superlative casts. Netrebko's blooming soprano and dignity - even in a billowy white nightgown - humanized the princess. Piotr Beczala's tenor gleamed as Vaudemont, who lights up her life."
< back

You must be logged in to view this item.





This area is reserved for members of the news media. If you qualify, please update your user profile and check the box marked "Check here to register as an accredited member of the news media". Please include any notes in the "Supporting information for media credentials" box. We will notify you of your status via e-mail in one business day.